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'Titanic Tuesday': Boris Johnson's big Brexit push

The PM is expected to secure a small majority during the second reading of the bill, signalling MPs' approval for it to proceed in principle, but the motion setting out the timetable is forecast to fail.

Article originally published by The Week. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

MPs are expected to back PM's deal - but block his plan to force through Brexit by 31 October

The House of Commons will vote on whether to back his Withdrawal Agreement Bill, which was published last night. If MPs approve the bill, they will then be asked to agree an intensive three-day timetable in which to consider the legislation.

After many dubbed last weekend’s pivotal day in the Commons as “Super Saturday,” the Daily Mail describes today as “Titanic Tuesday”.

According to the paper, Johnson will tell MPs: “We have negotiated a new deal so that we can leave without disruption and provide a framework for a new relationship based on free trade and friendly cooperation. We are leaving the European Union but we will always be European”.

The PM is expected to secure a small majority during the second reading of the bill, signalling MPs’ approval for it to proceed in principle, but the motion setting out the timetable is forecast to fail.

Many opposition MPs have objected to the proposed timetable, which “means that MPs would have less than 24 hours over three days to scrutinise the complex legislation”, says The Times. Labour’s shadow Brexit secretary, Sir Keir Starmer, said it was “outrageous to deny parliament the chance to scrutinise this incredibly important legislation properly”.

Delays may follow even if the timetable motion is passed, as MPs try to amend the legislation. Labour has thrown its backing behind plans to push for a customs union and a second referendum.

Given that Johnson’s government opposed both, he is likely to push for a general election rather than accept either amendment.

Such a move could be on the cards anyway: as The Guardian says there are “growing signs” that the PM will “make a renewed push for a general election whether his deal passes or not”. A source tells the paper that Johnson will pivot to the centre-ground by parting ways with his divisive chief adviser, Dominic Cummings. “Boris created the monster, so Boris could slay it,” the source said.

Johnson has repeatedly vowed to take Britain out of the EU, “do or die”, by 31 October. Unless he has ratified his deal by then, Brexit is likely to be delayed until 31 January.


This article was from The Week and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Article originally published by The Week. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

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