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Sajid Javid resigns as chancellor amid Johnson reshuffle

Javid has been in post since the summer and repeatedly clashed with Johnson's senior adviser, Dominic Cummings, over issues such as restraints on spending.

Article originally published by The Guardian. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

Sajid Javid has resigned as chancellor after Boris Johnson asked him to sack all of his advisers in a move by No 10 to seize control over the Treasury.

Javid has been replaced by his deputy, Rishi Sunak, the chief secretary to the Treasury, who is a favourite within No 10.

Javid has been in post since the summer and repeatedly clashed with Johnson’s senior adviser, Dominic Cummings, over issues such as restraints on spending.

His shock departure comes just weeks before he was due to deliver his first budget. Sunak will now take on that responsibility, despite having entered parliament less than five years ago.

A source close to Javid said: “He has turned down the job of chancellor of the exchequer. The PM said he had to fire all his special advisers and replace them with No 10 special advisers to make it one team. The chancellor said no self-respecting minister would accept those terms.”

Johnson sprang the changes on Javid with no warning, leaving the chancellor and his staff shocked. He had proposed that Javid get rid of all his political staff and allow No 10 to create a joint unit pooling advisers with Johnson.

Related: Boris Johnson's reshuffle: who's in, who's out, at a glance

Labour’s John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, said Javid’s resignation showed that Cummings had “clearly won the battle to take absolute control of the Treasury and install his stooge as chancellor”.

“This must be a historical record, with the government in crisis after just over two months in power,” he said.

There have been bad relations between No 10 and No 11 ever since Cummings fired Javid’s press secretary, Sonia Khan, in August without consulting him after alleging she was responsible for leaks, which she denied. She had refused to hand over her phone, and security escorted her out of the building.

Since then, there have been rows between No 10 and Javid’s team over the Conservatives’ economic policy at the election and the contents of the budget. Javid had been pushing for tighter fiscal rules, while No 10 wanted fewer constraints on spending.

No 10 had always insisted that relations between Javid and Johnson were personally fine, with the prime minister attending the chancellor’s 50th birthday party along with his partner, Carrie Symonds, a former adviser to Javid.

However, tensions have been simmering for months at adviser level, with particular annoyance in No 10 that Javid had made it known he was in favour of HS2 before the official announcement.

The longstanding rows ultimately ended in No 10’s attempt to seize political control over the direction of the Treasury.


This article was written by Peter Walker and Rowena Mason from The Guardian and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Article originally published by The Guardian. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

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