We don’t support this browser anymore.
This means our website may not look and work as you would expect. Read more about browsers and how to update them here.

Skip to main content
  • Register
  • Help
  • Contact us

Netflix plans new versions of Roald Dahl stories with takeover deal

New versions of Roald Dahl's beloved children's stories are coming to the small screen after Netflix struck a deal to buy the company that manages his rights.

Article originally published by The Telegraph. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

Netflix takes over the Roald Dahl Story Company, which manages the rights to the author’s characters

New versions of Roald Dahl’s beloved children’s stories are coming to the small screen after Netflix struck a deal to buy the company that manages his rights.

The streaming giant has snapped up the late author's entire catalogue of novels, which have been translated into 63 languages and sold more than 300m copies worldwide.

Netflix already had an agreement in place to make animated programmes based on Dahl’s works. It has tapped Oscar-winning director Taika Waititi to make a new series based on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and is also producing an adaptation of the musical Matilda.

The company is buying the Roald Dahl Story Company, which manages the rights to his characters across publishing, TV, film, theatre and merchandise.

Ted Sarandos, co-chief executive of Netflix, and Luke Kelly, the story company's boss and grandson of the author, said: "As we bring these timeless tales to more audiences in new formats, we’re committed to maintaining their unique spirit and their universal themes of surprise and kindness, while also sprinkling some fresh magic into the mix."

The deal is unusual step for Netflix as it usually only buys the rights for content.

It will give the company access to a rich new seam of content for its 200m-plus subscribers as it fights competition from the likes of Amazon Prime and Disney+.

The three-year-old existing agreement was reported to be worth as much as $1bn, thought to be one of the highest for a children's and family entertainment deal.

The value of the latest deal was not disclosed. The Roald Dahl Story Company's managers will stay on to operate it as an independent division within Netflix.

Mr Dahl died in 1990 aged 74. His books have shown an enduring popularity that has extended to the big screen.

A version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory starring Johnny Depp was the world’s eighth-highest grossing film in 2005, while director Wes Anderson’s take on The Fantastic Mr Fox was nominated for an Oscar in 2010.

More recently, Disney made a version of The BFG, released in 2016, while Warner Bros adapted The Witches in 2020.

A musical version of Matilda composed by Tim Minchin also proved a big success in the West End and on Broadway.

This article was written by James Warrington and Louis Ashworth from The Telegraph and was legally licensed through the Industry Dive publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@industrydive.com.


Newsroom: our daily email

Sign up to receive the daily headlines that matter to investors.


Please correct the following errors before you continue:

    Existing client? Please log in to your account to automatically fill in the details below.

    Loading

    Your postcode ends:

    Not your postcode? Enter your full address.

    Loading

    Hargreaves Lansdown PLC group companies will usually send you further information by post and/or email about our products and services. If you would prefer not to receive this, please do let us know. We will not sell or trade your personal data.

    Article originally published by The Telegraph. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

    Free news email alerts

    • Daily and weekly news
    • Major Publishers
    Register