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Train strike hangover leaves Tube shut as commuters endure more delays

London Underground services will not begin running until 8am, while only 60 per cent of rail services running nationally.

Article originally published by The Telegraph. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

London Underground services will not begin running until 8am, while only 60 per cent of rail services running nationally.

Commuters will continue to face travel misery on Wednesday, with just 60 per cent of rail services running nationwide due to a delay to the start of services as workers are not doing overnight shifts.

Talks between unions and network rail will resume today in a bid to resolve a bitter dispute over jobs, pay and conditions.

Fewer than one in five trains ran on Tuesday after members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) on Network Rail (NR) and 13 train operators staged the first of three walkouts, with strikes set to follow on Thursday and Saturday.

RMT members on London Underground also went on strike on Tuesday. Tube services are not scheduled to begin until 8am.

The joint action caused travel chaos across the UK, with journeys taking longer and roads rammed with traffic as people switched to cars or buses to get to work.

Anthony Smith, the Chief Executive of Transport Focus, told the BBC: "Today is going to be quite a messy day still."

"Do not assume this is a normal day. If you are going to travel by train, check before you leave the house, check on the way to the station and for goodness sake, take a bottle of water with you."

The chaos will continue on Wednesday, with only 60 per cent of trains running, mainly due to a delay to the start of services as signallers and control room staff are not doing overnight shifts.

The RMT will meet with NR and the train companies on Wednesday in another attempt to break the deadlock.

RMT general secretary Mick Lynch said the turnout at picket lines on Tuesday was "fantastic" and had exceeded expectations in the union's campaign for job security, defending conditions and a decent pay rise.

He said: "Our members will continue the campaign and have shown outstanding unity in the pursuit of a settlement to this dispute.

"RMT members are leading the way for all workers in this country who are sick and tired of having their pay and conditions slashed by a mixture of big business profits and Government policy.

"Now is the time to stand up and fight for every single railway worker in this dispute that we will win."

A Department for Transport spokesperson said: "These are desperately needed reforms that modernise the railway and put it on a sustainable footing for passengers and taxpayers.

"Unions have shut down big parts of the rail network, hitting local businesses and unfairly cutting people off from hospitals, schools and work.

"However, early data shows that unlike in the past many people now have the opportunity to work from home, so we haven't even a rush to the roads, as traffic has instead gone online, which means the unions aren't having the overall impact they might have hoped."

The union has been asked by Network Rail to attend formal consultation talks next month on introducing "modern working practices".

'Roles will be reduced by around 1,800'

Network Rail official Tim Shoveller said the changes will mean "dumping outdated working practices and introducing new technology".

He added: "We expect this will reduce roles by around 1,800, the vast majority of which will be lost through voluntary severance and natural wastage."

Most adults believe the rail strikes are justified, according to an opinion poll.

A survey of over 2,300 people by Savanta ComRes showed that 58 per cent said the industrial action was justified.

Younger adults aged 18-34 (72 per cent) and Labour voters (79 per cent) were more likely to see the strikes as justified compared to their older, aged 55+, (44 per cent) and Conservative-voting (38 per cent) counterparts.

Three out of five of those polled poll said they are generally supportive of the principle of industrial action, while just 35 per cent were generally opposed.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson put the public on notice for further strike action as Downing Street said it would "not give in" to demands from the rail unions.

Mr Johnson warned commuters they must be ready to "stay the course" and urged rail bosses and unions to agree on a modernisation package to safeguard the future of the industry.

This article was written by Telegraph reporters from The Telegraph and was legally licensed through the Industry Dive Content Marketplace. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@industrydive.com.

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    Article originally published by The Telegraph. Hargreaves Lansdown is not responsible for its content or accuracy and may not share the author's views. News and research are not personal recommendations to deal. All investments can fall in value so you could get back less than you invest.

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