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Next week on the stock market

What to expect from a selection of FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies reporting next week.

Important notes

This article isn’t personal advice. If you’re not sure whether an investment is right for you please seek advice. If you choose to invest the value of your investment will rise and fall, so you could get back less than you put in.

Among FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies scheduled to report next week:

  • ASOS could show significant improvement in operating margins thanks to lower returns
  • Barratt Developments will give us another update on the health of the housing market
  • Domino’s focusses on rebuilding bridges with franchisees, but long term growth plans are still unclear
  • FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other stocks scheduled to report next week

    12-Oct
    XP Power Q3 Trading Update
    13-Oct
    Sabre Trading Update
    14-Oct
    ASOS* Full Year Results
    Barratt Developments* Trading Statement
    Page Q3 Trading Statement
    15-Oct
    Domino's Q3 Trading Statement
    Dunelm Q1 Trading Statement
    Hays Q1 Trading Statement
    Mediclinic Half Year Trading Statement
    Mondi Q3 Trading Statement
    Rathbones Q3 Interim Management Statement
    16-Oct
    J D Wetherspoon Full Year Results
    Jupiter Fund Management Trading Statement

    *Companies on which we will be writing research.

    ASOS– Sophie Lund-Yates, Equity Analyst

    ASOS surprised the market back in August, after it upgraded full year expectations. Lower return rates and strong post-lockdown trading means pre-tax profit should be £130-£150m.

    However, margins continue to trouble us. Operating margins have really struggled in recent years, but fewer returns in lockdown and beyond means we could see some significant improvement here. On top of this, we’re encouraged by the reduced promotional activity, which should also be good news on the margin front. The question though is whether these trends will continue in more ‘normal’ market conditions. A jittery economic outlook means it’s possible the sales stickers have been brought out of hibernation.

    Net debt stood at around 1.8 times cash profits at the last count – more than we’d like. However, the group continues to target being net cash by the end of the year. We’ll be pretty impressed if that’s delivered.

    See the latest asos share price, charts and how to trade

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    Barratt Developments – Nicholas Hyett, Equity Analyst

    The housebuilders have done surprisingly well this year, all things considered. In its full year results Barratt said trading in the early part of the year had been “encouraging”, with a higher sales rate than last year. Management attributed this to pent up demand created during lockdown, the Stamp Duty holiday and buyers pre-empting the upcoming changes to Help to Buy. We expect most of the pent up demand to have unwound by now, but the other two factors should still be in play.

    However, there are some reasons to worry. The Furlough Scheme is being replaced by a much less generous Job Support Scheme, coronavirus cases are on the rise and the economy hasn’t fully recovered. The UK’s housing market has been resilient so far, but we’re not out of the woods yet.

    See the latest Barratt share price, charts and how to trade

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    Domino’s Pizza Group – Nicholas Hyett, Equity Analyst

    Domino’s has weathered the lockdown storm rather well. Overall sales rose 5.5% in the second quarter, as 22% growth in deliveries more than offset the steep decline in collected orders.

    However, some longer running issues are still unresolved.

    For several years now the group has had a stormy relationship with the franchisees who actually run its stores. The dissatisfaction centres around the decision to split existing franchise territories into smaller units. That boosts overall sales, but at the expense of existing stores. Together with higher labour costs and higher prices for food inputs that’s negatively impacted franchisee profitability.

    Resolving that tension is job number one for Domino’s new management team.

    With territory splits having clearly proved unpopular, and disposals of several of the group’s international businesses also complete, the big question is how the group can drive growth from here. That’s a question management have yet to answer.

    See the latest Domino's share price, charts and how to trade

    This article is not advice or a recommendation to buy, sell or hold any investment. No view is given on the present or future value or price of any investment, and investors should form their own view on any proposed investment. Investments and income they produce can rise and fall in value so investors could make a loss. Past performance is not a guide to the future. This article has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and is considered a marketing communication. Non-independent research is not subject to FCA rules prohibiting dealing ahead of research, however HL has put controls in place (including dealing restrictions, physical and information barriers) to manage potential conflicts of interest presented by such dealing. Please see our full non-independent research disclosure for more information.


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    Important notes

    This article isn’t personal advice. If you’re not sure whether an investment is right for you please seek advice. If you choose to invest the value of your investment will rise and fall, so you could get back less than you put in.

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