Coronavirus - we're here to help
From how to access your account online, scam awareness, your wellbeing and our community we're here to help.

Skip to main content
  • Register
  • Help
  • Contact us
  • Log in to HL Account

Next week on the stock market

What to expect from a selection of FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies reporting next week.

Important notes

This article isn’t personal advice. If you’re not sure whether an investment is right for you please seek advice. If you choose to invest the value of your investment will rise and fall, so you could get back less than you put in.

Among FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies scheduled to report next week:

  • Unilever will show how normalising sales trends are impacting the top line
  • Verizon will tell us whether its US customers are back buying phones
  • Barclays shares struggle in an increasingly tough environment

FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other stocks scheduled to report next week

19-Oct
BHP Group Q1 Operational Update
20-Oct
Bellway Full Year Results
Netflix* Q3 Results
Reckitt Benckiser* Q3 Interim Management Statement
Softcat Full Year Results
21-Oct
C&C Group Half Year Results
Centamin Q3 Production Report
Nestle* Q3 Trading Statement
Quilter Q3 Flow Update
Segro Q3 Trading Statement
Verizon* Q3 Results
William Hill* Trading Statement
22-Oct
AJ Bell Full Year Trading Statement
Coca-Cola Company* Q3 Results
Moneysupermarket.com Q3 Trading Statement
Rentokil Initial Q3 Trading Statement
Spectris Trading Statement
Travis Perkins Q3 Trading Statement
Unilever* Q3 Trading Statement
23-Oct
Airtel Africa Half Year Results
Barclays* Q3 Results
Essentra Q3 Trading Statement
InterContinental Hotels Group* Q3 Trading Statement
London Stock Exchange Group Q3 Trading Statement

*Companies on which we will be writing research.

Unilever – Sophie Lund-Yates, Equity Analyst

We haven’t heard from Unilever since July, when it fared better than expected at the half year. Big increases in food and hygiene sales helped mitigate some of the impact from lost revenue in the catering sector and out-of-home eating.

As shopping trends return to normal, but restaurant eating is still subdued, we wonder what happened to sales in the third quarter. In particular we’ll be looking at how sales are doing in developed markets, which were sluggish before the outbreak and where we’re dubious about Unilever’s ability to propel long-term growth. Total underlying sales fell 0.1% in the half year, so this is what we’ll be benchmarking against.

The other piece of big news will be any details on the de-merger of the tea business. Household names like PG Tips are being sold in developed markets. This is to help the business become more streamlined, and any updates on progress would be well received.

See the latest Unilever share price, charts and how to trade

Sign up for Unilever updates

Verizon – Sophie Lund-Yates, Equity Analyst

Verizon’s weathered the pandemic pretty well so far. The internet is really an essential service, especially when many of us are working from home or just being bored from home during the pandemic. Hardware sales did take a hit during the lockdowns as in store sales were curtailed by social distancing measures, and it will be interesting to see whether sales have bounced back or even increased now that lockdown measures have been eased.

Service revenue also fell a little, mainly due to lower roaming charges, waived fees and pressure on small business customers. Verizon Media sales also fell thanks to lower advertising and search revenue.

Because of falling hardware sales and some increased costs management expects full year earnings per share growth to be broadly flat, having previously forecast low single digit growth. The situation has changed considerably in the last few months though, so we wouldn’t be surprised to see further revisions.

See the latest Verizon share price, charts and how to trade

Sign up for Verizon updates

Barclays – Nicholas Hyett, Equity Analyst

The coronavirus outbreak has hammered Barclays’ share price – down some 44.5% year-to-date and now trading on a price to book ratio of just 0.28. That reflects some very real worries about not just Barclays but the entire UK banking sector.

The most immediate challenge facing the industry is a rise in bad loans. In their first half results Barclays set aside £3.7bn, as the board expected rising unemployment and corporate bankruptcies to result in less of its loans being repaid. We don’t think the global economic picture has improved much since then and expect more provisions this quarter.

The other major headwind is falling interest rates and particularly the threat of rates going negative. With interest rates on savings accounts already at rock bottom, but lower central bank rates pushing down the rate banks can charge to borrowers, the bank’s ‘net interest margin’ (the difference between what the bank pays for funding and what it earns on loans) is set for a squeeze. That would fundamentally reduce profitability.

The good news is that Barclays’ sizeable investment banking business is less reliant on interest income. Volatile financial markets are good news for investment banks, since they mean more trading and hedging activity. The scary days of March are now behind us, volatility has remained high in the third quarter and that should help the bank’s trading desks. However, whether that will be enough to offset weakness in core banking activities remains to be seen.

See the latest Barclays share price, charts and how to trade

Sign up for Barclays updates

Before you can invest in US companies you’ll need to complete a W-8BEN. Find out more about the charges.

Unless otherwise stated estimates are a consensus of analyst forecasts provided by Thomson Reuters. These estimates are not a reliable indicator of future performance. Past performance is not a guide to the future. Investments and income they produce can rise and fall in value so investors could make a loss.

This article is not advice or a recommendation to buy, sell or hold any investment. No view is given on the present or future value or price of any investment, and investors should form their own view on any proposed investment. This article has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and is considered a marketing communication. Non-independent research is not subject to FCA rules prohibiting dealing ahead of research, however HL has put controls in place (including dealing restrictions, physical and information barriers) to manage potential conflicts of interest presented by such dealing. Please see our full non-independent research disclosure for more information.


Share insight: our weekly email

Sign up to receive weekly shares content from HL

Please correct the following errors before you continue:

    Existing client? Please log in to your account to automatically fill in the details below.

    Loading

    Your postcode ends:

    Not your postcode? Enter your full address.

    Loading

    Hargreaves Lansdown PLC group companies will usually send you further information by post and/or email about our products and services. If you would prefer not to receive this, please do let us know. We will not sell or trade your personal data.



    What did you think of this article?

    What did you think of this article?

    Thanks for your feedback

    Click here

    What did you think of this article?

    Thanks for your feedback

    Click here

    Important notes

    This article isn’t personal advice. If you’re not sure whether an investment is right for you please seek advice. If you choose to invest the value of your investment will rise and fall, so you could get back less than you put in.

    Editor's choice – our weekly email

    Sign up to receive the week's top investment stories from Hargreaves Lansdown. Including:

    • Latest comment on economies and markets
    • Expert investment research
    • Financial planning tips
    Sign up

    Related articles

    Category: Politics

    US Election – an investor's guide

    Who will win the US election, Biden or Trump? We take a closer look at the race for the White House and what all this could mean for investors.

    Charlotte Walsh

    23 Oct 2020 3 min read

    Category: Shares

    Next week on the stock market

    What to expect from a selection of FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies reporting next week.

    Nicholas Hyett

    23 Oct 2020 5 min read

    Category: Shares

    Investing through lockdowns - three shares that could withstand disruption

    Lockdowns mean tough times for lots of companies, but not all. Here are three shares that don’t dread disruption.

    Sophie Lund-Yates

    22 Oct 2020 8 min read

    Category: Shares

    Why profits aren’t all made equal and what that means for PE ratios

    PE ratios are the most common way of valuing companies, but differences in earnings quality mean they have their limits.

    Nicholas Hyett

    20 Oct 2020 5 min read