We don’t support this browser anymore.
This means our website may not look and work as you would expect. Read more about browsers and how to update them here.

Skip to main content
  • Register
  • Help
  • Contact us

What are people’s biggest pension concerns? Tips to help you plan

We share our top tips to take the worry out of pension planning – including how to boost your pot before the end of the tax year.

Important notes

This article isn’t personal advice. If you’re not sure whether an investment is right for you please seek advice. If you choose to invest the value of your investment will rise and fall, so you could get back less than you put in.

When we asked people what their biggest concern was about pensions, just under a third said the constant tinkering with pension rules made them nervous. And with the spring statement just around the corner on 23 March, there’s no guarantee the government won’t tinker with the rules again.

Hopefully it will be a quiet statement from a pensions’ perspective. The government has already frozen and reduced many pension allowances in recent years.

Investment volatility is also a key concern. A quarter said sharp market drops like we saw in the early days of the pandemic, and more recently with the Russia-Ukraine conflict, can be worrying. Remember though, what goes down often can come back up again, and as markets recover so can your pension fund. Of course, there are no guarantees. Investments can fall as well as rise in value, so you could get back less than you invest.

If you too have concerns when it comes to pensions, here are four top tips to help take the worry out of your retirement planning.

This article isn’t personal advice. If you’re not sure what’s right for you, ask for financial advice. Pension and tax rules can change, and benefits depend on your circumstances. Once held in a pension money isn’t usually accessible until age 55 (57 from 2028).

1. Keep an eye on the annual allowance and your contribution levels

To check that you’re staying well within the rules, it’s important to keep an eye on the annual pension allowance limits and your regular payments. This is especially important if you’re a high earner, or if you’ve recently taken a taxable income from your pension. Your allowances might be different to the standard limits.

Most people have an annual limit of £40,000 each tax year. But the government can change this limit at any time. For instance, the annual pension allowance was reduced to £40,000 in the 2014/15 tax year from £50,000, and it’s stayed at this level since.

If you’re a high earner, your standard annual allowance could be as little as £4,000 if you have an adjusted income over £240,000. Adjusted income is broadly your total income, plus the pension contributions your employer pays in for you.

Similarly, if you’ve taken a taxable income from your pension (not just tax-free cash), you might have triggered the Money Purchase Annual Allowance. This also restricts you to contributions of no more than £4,000 per tax year.

More about how much I can pay into a pension

Don’t miss out on this year’s tax allowances

Open or add money to an HL Self-Invested Personal Pension (SIPP) by 5 April 2022 to make the most of your pension allowances this tax year.

Set up monthly payments from as little as £25, or make one-off payments of £100 or more.

Find out more about the HL SIPP

2. Find out if you’re nearing the Lifetime Allowance

The Lifetime Allowance is a limit on how much you can build up in your pensions without getting a tax charge.

In the March 2021 budget, despite usual changes to this limit, the government confirmed that it will be frozen at £1,073,100 until April 2026. This means more people are likely to get caught by the Lifetime Allowance and will have to pay a hefty tax bill.

If you don’t know the total value of your pensions, it’s worth contacting your pension providers to find out. You’ll then have a better understanding of how much you’ve saved, and whether you’re nearing the limit. If you think your pension value might reach over £1,000,000 in the future, it’s worth talking through your options with a financial adviser.

It’s possible to get protection against the Lifetime Allowance, although this could mean you need to stop contributing to your pension. You can learn more about the Lifetime Allowance, how to get protection and the calculations you’ll need in our essential Lifetime Allowance factsheet.

3. Take a long-term approach to market volatility

We know it’s easier said than done, but successfully managing a pension during market ups and downs requires a level head and a long-term approach.

Anyone who’s invested in a pension for the long term will have gone through various bouts of stock market wobbles. This is the nature of investing. It can be worrying to see your fund value drop, but it’s worth remembering that markets often move in cycles. At times like these, it’s important to go back to basics and re-focus on your long-term plan. Investments can fall as well as rise in value so you could get back less than you invest.

4. Regularly review how much you can afford to save

It’s good to keep an eye on how much you’re contributing to your pension and increasing it wherever possible (as long as you stay within your annual limits). For instance, when you get a pay increase, bonus or even move job. Small increases to your pension contributions can really add up over time.

If you want to boost your pension contributions with HL, you can choose to make a one-off lump sum contribution to your SIPP from just £100. Or you can spread your contributions over the year with monthly investing from £25.

How to make a lump sum contribution

More on regular investing

Editor's choice: our weekly email

Sign up to receive the week’s top investment stories from Hargreaves Lansdown

Please correct the following errors before you continue:

    Existing client? Please log in to your account to automatically fill in the details below.

    Loading

    Your postcode ends:

    Not your postcode? Enter your full address.

    Loading

    Hargreaves Lansdown PLC group companies will usually send you further information by post and/or email about our products and services. If you would prefer not to receive this, please do let us know. We will not sell or trade your personal data.

    What did you think of this article?

    Important notes

    This article isn’t personal advice. If you’re not sure whether an investment is right for you please seek advice. If you choose to invest the value of your investment will rise and fall, so you could get back less than you put in.

    Editor's choice – our weekly email

    Sign up to receive the week's top investment stories from Hargreaves Lansdown. Including:

    • Latest comment on economies and markets
    • Expert investment research
    • Financial planning tips
    Sign up

    Related articles

    Category: Markets

    Next week on the stock market

    What to expect from a selection of FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies reporting next week.

    Sophie Lund-Yates

    20 May 2022 5 min read

    Category: Markets

    Next week on the stock market

    What to expect from a selection of FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies reporting next week.

    Laura Hoy

    13 May 2022 6 min read

    Category: Markets

    Next week on the stock market

    What to expect from a selection of FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and selected other companies reporting next week.

    Matt Britzman

    06 May 2022 4 min read

    Category: UK Shares

    How to value shares – using different ratios to improve your analysis

    We explain how to use different ratios – price to earnings, price to book and price to sales – to value shares, and where the best place to use each might be when comparing different company valuations.

    Laura Hoy, Equity Analyst

    05 May 2022 6 min read