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Pension tax relief calculator

How little could your pension contribution cost you?

You can receive up to 45% pension tax relief for this tax year (2017/2018) when you make a contribution to a pension such as the Vantage SIPP. Basic, higher and top rate taxpayers can benefit: the higher your rate of tax, the more you could receive.

For example:

  • You contribute £8,000 into your pension.
  • The government adds £2,000, to make a total investment of £10,000.
  • Higher and top rate taxpayers can then claim back even more via their tax return. £10,000 in a pension could therefore effectively cost a 40% rate taxpayer as little as £6,000 and a 45% rate taxpayer as little as £5,500.

Download your free guide to pension tax relief

This calculator shows you how much tax relief you can receive now. It does not show if you're eligible to make a contribution. You can only contribute tax-efficiently up to as much as you earn. The annual allowance (including the money purchase annual allowance or tapered annual allowance, if applicable) could also affect you. Check how much you can contribute.

You must pay sufficient tax at the higher or top rate to claim the full higher (40%) or top (45%) rate tax relief. Tax rules can change over time and the benefits will depend on your individual circumstances.

Calculate the tax relief you could receive on your lump sum personal pension contribution

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For more details of the Scottish rate of Income Tax please see GOV.UK
This is your current annual taxable income. It will be used to calculate the amount of tax relief you are eligible to receive.
This is the gross lump sum contribution you would like to pay into your pension. It will be used to calculate the net amount you'll actually pay and the basic rate tax relief you'll receive from the government. A £40,000 annual allowance currently applies to most people, although you may be able to carry forward unused allowances to invest as much as £160,000 now. The figures are for the 2017/18 tax year.

Why have we used these figures?

The chancellor will announce the outcome of a review of pension tax relief on 16 March 2016. It has been widely reported he is considering introducing a single savings incentive of between 25% and 33% for everyone.

It is important to note nothing has been confirmed. The chancellor could decide to change nothing or choose a different system.